Cyber-war 2024 (General)

by dulan drift ⌂, Monday, February 26, 2024, 07:12 (147 days ago)

We've identified a potential 9-11 level cyber-attack as a possibility in the immediate future, so this is a thread to keep an eye on any developments. The big-one is the internet, but a major bank hack would also fit the bill (to usher in CBDCs).

Epoch Times: “Based on our initial review, we believe that today’s outage was caused by the application and execution of an incorrect process used as we were expanding our network, not a cyber attack,” AT&T said in a statement Friday.
The company did not reveal the exact cause of the service disruption.

The FBI said it communicated with AT&T, saying in a statement that “should we learn of any malicious activity we will respond accordingly.”

The thing about cyber-war is the opaqueness that goes with it. We all know it's going on but it's cloaked in this 'top-security' secrecy that authorities see as a license to say whatever crap they deem to be most expedient.

Maybe it was just a stuff-up, but i don't have any confidence that we'd be told the truth if it wasn't.

Cyber-war 2024

by dan, Tuesday, February 27, 2024, 15:14 (146 days ago) @ dulan drift

From USA Today:

The White House's national security communications adviser John Kirby said Thursday afternoon, “We're being told that AT&T has no reason to think that this was a cyber-security incident. But again, I want to be careful. We won't know until an investigation has been completed.”

Notice the use of the passive voice, which always hides the subject by replacing it with something else, in this case 'we'. So, who told them this?

But again, I want to be careful. We won't know until an investigation has been completed.

Covering their asses, which probably won't be necessary because the investigation will never be completed and if it is, it will be classified. Or people will just forget about the whole thing, which has already happened, mostly.

So, the entire network got shut down for, what, 12 hours or something? Because somebody wrote some bad code that was never caught before going live or threw a switch too soon? Highly unlikely.

Meanwhile, the White House, home of the top dog of the entire US military, doesn't know what the fuck happened and they're waiting for someone, we don't know who, to fill them in. Yeah, right.

And we're 30+ TRILLION dollars in debt.

Yeah... a change is coming, and it probably won't favor the masses.

Cyber-war 2024

by dulan drift ⌂, Thursday, February 29, 2024, 06:53 (144 days ago) @ dan

Meanwhile, the White House, home of the top dog of the entire US military, doesn't know what the fuck happened and they're waiting for someone, we don't know who, to fill them in. Yeah, right.

This is the main problem with cyber-war - it's conducted in secrecy. Why? I don't know. I assume to protect those involved from consequences.

Mike Burgess, ASIO (Aus's CIA): Several years ago, the A-team successfully cultivated and recruited a former Australian politician. This politician sold out their country, party and former colleagues to advance the interests of the foreign regime. At one point, the former politician even proposed bringing a prime minister's family member into the spies' orbit. Fortunately that plot did not go ahead but other schemes did.

If a politician, paid by the public, is 'selling out their country', why do they get to remain anonymous? It only encourages others to do it if there are no consequences. Asked why he was divulging this info now, he replied:

First – awareness. Australians need to understand what the threat looks like so they can avoid it and report it.
The second reason is more complicated. We decided to confront the A-team and then speak about it publicly as part of a real-world, real-time disruption.
We want the A-team to know its cover is blown. We want the A-team's bosses to know its cover is blown. If the team leader failed to report our conversation to his spymasters, he will now have to explain why he didn't, along with how ASIO knows so much about his team's operations and identities.

I'm calling BS. If you want them to know their cover is blown & For Australians to understand the threat, just name them. The A-Team is obviously the CCP, why are they being shielded? Well, we know the answer to that - it's due to Aus's economic dependence on China, so they can't afford to make their bosses angry. Let's also not forget that ASIO's entire blueprint for it's new HQ was leaked to China, so maybe that's why they don't want anyone being held accountable.

Burgess referenced the Optus internet outage last year - which he claimed was likely not a cyber-attack - but without transparency we'll never know.

That's one phone network not working for one day. Imagine the implications if a nation-state took down all the networks? Or turned off the power during a heatwave? I assure you, these are not hypotheticals – foreign governments have crack cyber teams investigating these possibilities right now, although they are only likely to materialise during a conflict or near conflict.

They're finally catching up to warnings Formosa Hut has been making for years. But i fail to see how shielding the perps & collaborators from public scrutiny is doing anything to prevent it. In fact, that would likely have the opposite effect.

Cyber-war 2024

by dan, Friday, March 01, 2024, 17:33 (143 days ago) @ dulan drift

Burgess referenced the Optus internet outage last year - which he claimed was likely not a cyber-attack - but without transparency we'll never know.

It's a good point and it raises two issues right off the bat.

First, as you say, why hide the perpetrators? Is it because you don't know who they are or because you don't want to share the information.

If you don't know who they are, then what the fuck are you getting paid for. If you do know who they are, why aren't you telling us. Do you have something to hide?

The other, more tinfoil hat, conspiracy theory question, is twofold.

First, can we ever know? It's digital warfare. It's not like Pearl Harbor getting bombed, and even that has it's conspiracy theories, but at least you can see it. The only evidence we have of an attack is that our phones don't work or we can't access our bank. It's the perfect crime no matter who is committing it.

And is it even an attack? If your phone doesn't work, how is that an attack? It's an attack if we're told it is. Otherwise, it's a technical glitch.

If you can't access your bank or the trains don't work or the electricity goes off, we only know what we're told by the experts. We have no proof whatsoever of what caused it.

That's the scary part of all this. We're totally dependent.

The second, double tinfoil hat question is this --

Every new weapon requires testing. Atomic weapons have been tested extensively, as well as nukes, etc. We have video confirmation of this. We can see it. It leaves traces.

How are the superpowers testing their new cyber weapons? Because they must be! Now! They have to be! No country would launch a cyber war without first testing the weapons.

So how? Well, because they don't cause immediate death and destruction, I can imagine that they consider it OK to test them in the real world, and maybe that's what we're experiencing.

This wouldn't be the first time by a long shot.

Cyber-war 2024

by dulan drift ⌂, Saturday, March 02, 2024, 06:30 (142 days ago) @ dan


How are the superpowers testing their new cyber weapons? Because they must be! Now! They have to be! No country would launch a cyber war without first testing the weapons.

So how? Well, because they don't cause immediate death and destruction, I can imagine that they consider it OK to test them in the real world, and maybe that's what we're experiencing.

Despite all the secrecy, there are things we can still deduce, & as you say, cyber-weapon testing is a racing certainty. If it's an outside state doing it then they'd like to see (a) does it work?, (b) what effect does it cause?, (c) how quickly is the target state able to restore it?

Another thing about turning the internet off is that it also has an upside for the affected country - it dramatically narrows the populace's source of information & ability to discuss/criticize issues. When it goes out, somehow the TV will still work, so we'll be back to a situation where MSM has total control of what's projected to the public. (The Indian government turns the internet off regularly for this reason.)

This would present a great opportunity to institute whatever crazy 'keep-us-safe' power grab that the authorities have next on their 'to do' list. As such, there's incentive there to either allow an attack, DIY it, or extend it, as per some critiques regarding 9-11.

Cyber-war 2024

by dan, Friday, March 15, 2024, 18:05 (129 days ago) @ dulan drift

Looking into U.S. healthcare providers reeling from cyberattack.

This appears to be an extremely disruptive 'event' that has been massively under reported.

Some relevant snippets:

Change Healthcare processes about 50% of medical claims in the U.S. for around 900,000 physicians, 33,000 pharmacies, 5,500 hospitals and 600 laboratories.

There is virtually no information regarding how this happened.

There is this, but it is unsubstantiated, and it's all we've been told as far as I can tell:

WASHINGTON, Feb 28 (Reuters) - In a message posted to, and then quickly deleted from their darknet site, the hackers blamed for striking the United Health Group (UNH.N), opens new tab said on Wednesday they stole millions of sensitive records, including medical insurance and health data, from the company. In its claim of responsibility, the group known as "Blackcat" or "ALPHV" posted a statement to its site saying it had stolen 8 terabytes of data from UnitedHealth, according to screenshots of the posting shared online by cybersecurity researchers.

So, we have this 'attack' that is still happening, and we have no idea how it started or who is responsible, and it is interfering with the health care infrastructure in the US. And the MSM is not asking serious questions and it is not, generally, being discussed. And the government is doing essentially nothing aside from an investigation.

So this is what we're supposed to accept as business as usual. Nothing to see here, folks.

Frog in the pot.

Cyber-war 2024

by dulan drift ⌂, Sunday, March 17, 2024, 07:34 (127 days ago) @ dan

So, we have this 'attack' that is still happening, and we have no idea how it started or who is responsible, and it is interfering with the health care infrastructure in the US. And the MSM is not asking serious questions and it is not, generally, being discussed. And the government is doing essentially nothing aside from an investigation.

This is what worries me the most - the self-appointed license to secrecy that comes with cyber-attacks - justified by some bs platitudes about the 'common good'.

We've reached a point where literally every digital database is vulnerable to hacking - coupled with a default cover-up mentality by those who hold the data. I'm beginning to wonder if some of these Orgs even care about security - it feels like we're being conditioned to simply accept it.

For sure we'll be asked to hand over even more biometric data 'to keep us safe', but it will only exacerbate the problem.

Cyber-war 2024

by dan, Sunday, March 31, 2024, 18:29 (113 days ago) @ dulan drift

US firm AT&T says data of 73 million customers leaked on ‘dark web’

Personal information belonging to millions of past and present AT&T customers has been leaked online, including Social Security numbers (SSNs), passcodes and contact details, the multinational company says.

SSNs are the gold standard of identity theft. Contact details would include phone numbers used for 2FA. So basically, everybody is fucked.

It is not known if the breach “originated from AT&T or one of its vendors”, the company said.

Of course not, so nobody is held accountable.

In addition to passcodes and SSNs, the hacked data possibly included email and mailing addresses, phone numbers and birth dates, AT&T added.

It just gets worse and worse if you choose to continue reading that far. It's fucking hilarious almost how meaningless it all is at this point.

MediSecure hack

by dulan drift ⌂, Thursday, July 18, 2024, 18:06 (4 days ago) @ dan

Half of Australia's population has been caught up in the cyberattack on MediSecure.
That makes it bigger than the Optus and Medibank data breaches in 2022.

Gotta love the irony. Biggest ever company hack in Australia ... happens to MediSecure.

Proves again, nothing is secure.

MediSecure: MediSecure can confirm that approximately 12.9 million Australians are impacted by this incident based on individuals' healthcare identifiers.
However, MediSecure is unable to identify the specific impacted individuals .. without incurring substantial cost that MediSecure was not in a financial position to meet.

Great. I don't think these companies give a flying fuck about the security of our data. They care about having it, that's all.

CrowdStrike outage

by dulan drift ⌂, Friday, July 19, 2024, 18:11 (3 days ago) @ dan

This is on top of the recent ATT hack:

AT&T says hackers stole records of nearly all cellular customers' calls and texts

They'd care more if they were locked-out of their own data haul, but if it's just copied (often by CCP), onsold to the scammer industry - & you're too big to fail - it's not a big deal. Tellingly, the MediSecure story has already subsidedfrom the MSM news cycle

Interestingly, there's a potential next-level global cyber attack going on right now. The narrative is another 'update' problem, but it's crashed several big banks' services in Aus & globally. It's serious enough to prompt an snap meeting of the National Emergency Mechanism in Aus

The PM Albanese understands Australians are "concerned about the outage that is unfolding globally and affecting a wide range of services. My Government is working closely with the National Cyber Security Coordinator."

It's probably not 'the big-one', but it's likely how it would start if it was.

MediSecure hack

by dan, Friday, July 19, 2024, 18:17 (3 days ago) @ dulan drift

It may not the the big one, but apparently it's pretty fucking big.

It knocked out CrowdStrike, which on it's website boasts: CrowdStrike excels in the MITRE Engenuity ATT&CK Evaluation, Managed Services detection-only test.

All flights in the US are grounded. That's hasn't happend since 911 AFAIK. Flights Grounded Across US.

The airline said that flights already airborne will continue with their journeys but no more will take off.

"We are in contact with our planes currently in flight," the airline spokesperson said.

MediSecure hack

by dan, Friday, July 19, 2024, 18:36 (3 days ago) @ dan

We're getting bullshit from the media. CrowdStrike is claiming it was a few snippets of code from a recent update to blame. I can't believe that.

How can a security software company execute code across it's clientele that hadn't been thoroughly tested? Airlines? Banks> Hospitals? Media? There are ways to test this that even a middle school nerd knows. It's complete BS.

Sorry, I don't buy it.

CrowdStrike outage

by dulan drift ⌂, Friday, July 19, 2024, 20:14 (3 days ago) @ dan


How can a security software company execute code across it's clientele that hadn't been thoroughly tested? Airlines? Banks> Hospitals? Media? There are ways to test this that even a middle school nerd knows. It's complete BS.

Sorry, I don't buy it.

Dr Mark Gregory, School of Engineering would agree with you:

There should have been no roll-out to an entire country or to the entire world without testing within CrowdStrike, and also testing on, for example, a company that has agreed to be a test site for that software.

The idea that this update has been rolled out globally and has caused this sort of problem is unthinkable.

Sounds suss. It's either gross incompetence or something nefarious has happened. Either way, there appears to be no regulations in Aus to punish the company, or any of its executives.

CrowdStrike outage

by dulan drift ⌂, Saturday, July 20, 2024, 05:34 (2 days ago) @ dulan drift

Michael Sentonas, president, CrowdStrike: If an organisation has been breached, I’ll often work with the team to coach them on how to deal with it. That could be how to deal with press, or avoiding coming out to say, ‘there’s a sophisticated adversary’.

In other words, first rule of a cyber attack: lie about it

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